Iconic producer Norman Lear doesn’t want to stop working

At 99, iconic producer Norman Lear doesn’t want to stop working. Can work help us live longer?

American producer, screenwriter and director Norman Lear, creator of iconic 1970s television characters such as fanatical fanatic Archie Bunker on the sitcom ‘All in the Family’, turns 100 in July. conference, a health and wellness event presented in partnership with CNN, he shared with the public his secrets for living into old age: Lox and bagels, love of his family, laughter and an invigorating working life . “I like to wake up in the morning with something in mind, something I can work on…to a conclusion,” Lear said. Over the past century, Lear has done it all. He served as executive producer of cult films ‘The Princess Bride’ and ‘Fried Green Tomatoes’ and was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Screenplay for ‘Divorce American Style’ Its sitcom spinoffs of ‘All in the Family’ dominated 70s and 80s television , tackling topics of racism, feminism, and social inequality that no one had yet dared to touch. Her political advocacy even led to the creation of the liberal political organization People for the American Way. Even in her 90s, a time when most people who live that long are lucky enough to swing on their porch, Lear has never stopped working. Along with Jimmy Kimmel, Lear, 95, produced and hosted three episodes of “Live in Front of a Studio Audience”, which won the Primetime Emmy Awards in 2019 and 2020. The series used current stars such as Jamie Fox, Woody Harrelson and Viola Davis to recreate original episodes of “The Jeffersons”, “All in the Family” and “Good Times”. In recent years, Lear and his business partner Brent Miller have rebooted some of his ’70s sitcom hits, including “One Day at a Time.” They also have several films and other projects underway. One of the secrets to his job’s longevity, Lear said, is his attitude to stress. During his ’70s sitcom heyday, Lear juggled to hit eight hit TV series: “All in the Family,” “Maude,” “Sanford and Son,” “Good Times,” “The Jeffersons,” ” One Day at a Time”, “Archie Bunker’s Place” and “Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman”. Yet in her 2014 book, “Even This I Get to Experience,” Lear wrote that this period of her life was full of “joyful stress.” your best work and enjoying the results, there’s a reasonable amount to a great amount of stress,” Lear told Variety last year. “And if you can learn to accept that with joy, you can be stressed and understand that we are also having a good time. And so, I’ve enjoyed that immensely throughout my career.”The Science of StressResearch shows that stress can be good for you, especially if you share Lear’s attitude. Considering stress a normal part, acceptable and even positive life can lead to resilience, and just like rock, paper, scissors…resilience covers stress But does that mean everyone should follow Lear’s lead and working well past the traditional retirement age? “Research shows that people who work longer are healthier and healthier people work longer. So it’s very tempting to look at this correlation and say, ‘Ah, that means working longer will make you live longer.’ But it’s a lot more complicated,” said sociologist Beth Truesdale, a research fellow at the WE Upjohn Institute for Employment Research. “If you’re in a job where you control your work environment and can make choices that allow you to take care of your family, then you’re in luck, and in that case, work stress can be difficult but satisfying,” she said. “But for many people, especially those without a college degree, the jobs are incredibly stressful because they have very little control.”

American producer, screenwriter and director Norman Lear, creator of iconic 1970s TV characters like bigoted swagger Archie Bunker on the sitcom ‘All in the Family’, turns 100 in July.

On Thursday, during an early celebration for Lear at Life Itself, a health and wellness event presented in partnership with CNN, he opened up to the public about his secrets for living into old age: Lox and bagels, love of family, laughter and an invigorating work life.

“I like to wake up in the morning with something in mind, something I can work on…to a conclusion,” Lear said.

Over the past century, Lear has done it all. He was executive producer of the cult films ‘The Princess Bride’ and ‘Fried Green Tomatoes’ and was nominated for an Oscar for Best Screenplay for ‘Divorce American Style’. Her sitcom spinoff of “All in the Family” dominated ’70s and ’80s television, tackling topics of racism, feminism and social inequality no one had yet dared to touch. His political advocacy even led to the creation of the Liberal Party political organization People for the American Way.

Even in his 90s, a time when most people who live that long are lucky enough to swing on their porch, Lear has never stopped working. Along with Jimmy Kimmel, Lear, 95, produced and hosted three episodes of “Live in Front of a Studio Audience,” which won Primetime Emmy Awards in 2019 and 2020. The series has used current stars including Jamie Fox, Woody Harrelson and Viola Davis to recreate original episodes of “The Jeffersons”, “All in the Family” and “Good Times”.

In recent years, Lear and his business partner Brent Miller have rebooted some of his ’70s sitcom hits, including “One Day at a Time.” They also have several films and other projects underway.

One of the secrets to his longevity at work, Lear said, is his attitude to stress. During his ’70s sitcom heyday, Lear juggled to hit eight hit TV series: “All in the Family,” “Maude,” “Sanford and Son,” “Good Times,” “The Jeffersons,” ” One Day at a Time”, “Archie Bunker’s Place” and “Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman.”

Yet in her 2014 book, “Even This I Get to Experience,” Lear wrote that this period of her life was full of “joyful stress.”

“Even doing your best and enjoying the results, there is a reasonable amount to a great amount of stress,” Lear told Variety Last year. “And if you can learn to accept that with joy, you can be stressed and understand that you’re also having a good time. And so, I’ve enjoyed that immensely throughout my career.”

The science of stress

Research shows that stress can be good for you, especially if you share Lear’s attitude. Viewing stress as a normal, acceptable, and even positive part of life can lead to resilience, and just like rock, paper, scissors…resilience covers stress.

But does that mean everyone should follow Lear’s lead and work well past the traditional retirement age?

“Research shows that people who work longer are healthier and healthier people work longer. So it’s very tempting to look at this correlation and say, ‘Ah, that means working longer you will live longer.’ But it’s much more complicated,” said sociologist Beth Truesdale, a researcher at the WE Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.

“If you’re in a job where you have control over your work environment and can make choices that allow you to take care of your family, then you’re in luck, and in that case job stress can be difficult. but satisfying,” she says. “But for many people, especially those without a college degree, the jobs are incredibly stressful because they have very little control.”

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